There’s a love song to capture every aspect of romance, from the unrequited to the tempestuous. With True Love (due out May 3 via Rondette Jazz), vocalist John Dokes turns his attention, and his elegant baritone, to something deeper. Over the course of ten well-chosen songs and an equally diverse range of moods, Dokes explores the more profound, committed side of affairs of the heart, bringing soulful nuance and hard-earned wisdom to each tale of ardent amour.

 As Dokes makes clear with each knowing inflection and wry turn of phrase, committed love doesn’t necessarily translate into comfortable routine. Throughout the album’s ten songs, Dokes imbues each lyric with smoldering passion or heart-wrenching loss, all the more affecting for being so deeply felt. Even in his suave delivery of the album’s sole original track, “Cool Enough,” the crooner undercuts his dapper cool with a tinge of self-doubt, pleading to know, “Am I cool?”

 Though he may have his moments of uncertainty, there’s little question while listening to True Love that Dokes falls squarely into the “cool” camp. Formerly a champion lindy hopper, he continues to get audiences dancing in his regular gig singing with the George Gee Big Band; he carries the same self-confidence from the ballroom to the boardroom, as the Chief Content Officer and President of Accuweather Network, following similarly successful tenures at Viacom and Marvel Entertainment.

 When working with the world-class quartet on True Love, though, the executive suite is the furthest thing from Dokes’ mind. The album is the second in a planned trilogy, each of which pairs Dokes with a different frontline horn. The first was 2017’s Forever Reasons, his initial small group endeavor (following his big band debut, John Dokes Sings, George Gee Swings), which featured trombonist David Gibson with the same rhythm section as this release: pianist Steve Einerson (Eric Alexander, Eddie Henderson), bassist Alex Claffy (Kurt Rosenwinkel, Jimmy Cobb), and drummer Lawrence Leathers (Cécile McLorin Salvant, Aaron Diehl). 

 On True Love they’re joined by alto saxophonist Mark Gross (Delfeayo Marsalis, Dave Holland), whose sinuous tone is an ideal match for Dokes’ dulcet baritone. Their chemistry is immediately apparent on “A Sleepin’ Bee,” the opening track, calling to mind the playful back-and-forth between Nancy Wilson and Cannonball Adderley on their immortal 1961 rendition, which inspired Dokes to include the song here. The song’s lyric, by writer Truman Capote, also lends the album its title, as Dokes concludes the song by repeating the phrase like an echoing memory.

John Dokes -   Forever Reasons   Session - Samurai Hotel Studios

John Dokes - Forever Reasons Session - Samurai Hotel Studios

 

John Dokes – Press Quotes

Then there’s the take on one of my favorite modern standards, Abbez’s Nature Boy. With John Dokes richly imbued baritone vocals, a guy who should be featured in movie musicals ‘cause his approach weds the Gatsby 1930’s to the 2000’s. 
— Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange
John Dokes -   Forever Reasons   Session - Samurai Hotel Studios

John Dokes - Forever Reasons Session - Samurai Hotel Studios

. . . Dokes sets his after hours sights on being this generation’s standard bearer for classic jazz vocal. Already a known quantity for his work with George Gee’s orchestra, Dokes does this magnificent job of taking you back to the day without this being a set of manqué-ing around. Swinging and warm throughout, you will find yourself wondering who this is from back then when it finally hits you this is now. Note perfect throughout, this is a wonderful return to class and sophistication that just can’t be beat. Hot stuff.
— Chris Spector, Midwest Record
Dokes has no problem getting over with the uptempo workouts, but he’s even more impressive as a balladeer
— David McGee